Solent NHS Trust logo

General Healthcare

Ongoing research

 

 

 

Little Talkers - An Examination of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy in Practice - A Qualitative Study Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT) is a common used intervention for pre-school children with specific language impairment. Speech and language therapists (SLT’s) conduct the PCIT interventions in many different ways and so as a result there is considerable variation in the way PCIT is delivered to patients. This research will identify the critical components of PCIT, according to the literature, the manuals of the PCIT approaches and the SLTs. This research will also look for reasons that the SLTs give for the way they structure their therapy. The SLTs will be interviewed and one therapy session conducted by each therapist will be observed.
Narratives of Health and Illness for Health Talk Online 2012 V1 The aim of this qualitative research piece is to improve understanding of people’s experiences of health and illness and their needs for information and support. Healthtalkonline and Youthhealthtalk are online resources where individuals discuss first-hand experiences of living with health and illness. The resource currently covers over 75 health conditions.  In this study qualitative semi-structured audio or video tape recorded interviews will be conducted with men and women over the age of 16, and children aged 10-15 who have experience of a particular health condition. The interviews will then contribute to the information presented on the Healthtalkonline and Youthhealthtalk websites.
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

 

 

Completed Projects and Publications

Children and young people’s missed health care appointments: reconceptualising ‘Did Not Attend’ to ‘Was Not Brought’ – a review of the evidence for practice, by Catherine Powell and Jane Appleton.

This study examined the issue of wastage in the NHS caused by missed appointments. Specifically, it looked at the widespread use of ‘Did Not Attend’ to record the missed appointments of children and adolescents. It suggested instead that the term ‘Was Not Brought’ would encourage positive interventions to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. In particular, it argued that healthcare professionals should take into consideration a child’s fundamental right to healthcare (as part of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of a Child), their responsibilities regarding child protection issues (failure to present children for healthcare can be deemed as neglect), and the prominence of failure to attend for healthcare in Serious Case Reviews.

Please also see the review by Professor Eileen Munro.

Powell, C, Appleton, J (2012) Children and young people’s missed health care appointments: Reconceptualising ‘Did Not Attend’ to ‘Was Not Brought’ - a review of the evidence for practice Journal of Research in Nursing 17:2, 181-192.

Children and young people’s missed health care appointments: Reconceptualising ‘Did Not Attend’ to ‘Was Not Brought’- a review of the evidence for practiceBASPCAN 8th Triennial Congress, Belfast: April 2012.

Contemporary Issues in Safeguarding and Child Protection 2nd National Child Health Conference, Telford: April 2012.

An illuminative evaluation of foster carers’ experiences of attending an Attachment Theory and Practice Training Programme offered by a Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service for Looked After Children, PhD Thesis, Mandy Burton.

This in-depth study explored the journey of 21 foster carers over time using a mixed methods approach. Results from the quantitative questionnaires suggest that foster carers provide care for foster children in Portsmouth with a high level of need in relation to their mental health. The results post training also suggest a trend towards reduced perceived emotional and behavioural difficulties presented by children in their care. Increased knowledge was measured and showed statistically significant differences from baseline, which were retained over time and led to the reported positive change in foster carers’ levels of confidence, ability to advocate for their child in a school setting and a sense of empowerment for foster carers. Findings from the qualitative data revealed ten themes and suggested that foster carers experience training as a journey of awareness in relation to understanding the mental health needs of the children in their care. The qualitative findings suggest that training enables foster carers to understand and gain confidence in parenting children in care with challenging behaviours. It was also reported that access and awareness of the CAMHS services was increased with a strengthening of working relationships for both experienced and new foster carers.

The team have now secured health funding to review the existing package of training to provide a six month intensive package of mental health training between 0ctober 2012 and April 2013.

Barriers and facilitators to undertaking nutritional screening of patients: a systematic review

The objective of this integrative review was to locate and review published research investigating barriers and facilitators to nutritional screening by nurses. Eleven publications were located and reviewed. The studies reported primarily involved acute care and indicated that routine screening for malnutrition will not take place unless it is considered an integral part of nursing assessment that is required by policy and resourced appropriately. The review was led by Sue Green, Senior Clinical Academic Research Fellow, Community Nursing.

Green S.M. & James E.P. (2013) Barriers and facilitators to undertaking nutritional screening of patients: a systematic review. J Hum Nutr Diet. doi:10.1111/jhn.12011

Barriers and facilitators to screening for malnutrition by community nurses: a qualitative study

Community healthcare workers often care for people who are malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. National guidelines outline that healthcare professionals should identify individuals who are malnourished in order to give appropriate nutritional support (NICE 2012). A simple screening process can be used to identify who is at risk of malnutrition. This study investigated community nurses’ perceptions of barriers and facilitators to undertaking nutritional screening using a qualitative approach. The findings suggested that screening is more likely to be completed when there is a clear expectation that it is undertaken, and training and resources are available. The need for a process or tool that nurses find easy to use and relevant to their practice area was highlighted. The study will soon be published in the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. This study was led by Sue Green, Senior Clinical Academic Research Fellow, Community Nursing.

Green. S.M., James. E., Latter S., Sutcliffe M. & Fader M.J. (2013) Barriers and facilitators to screening for malnutrition by community nurses: a qualitative study. J Hum Nutr Diet. doi:10.1111/jhn.12104