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Specific Treatments

Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT)

Mindfulness means learning to pay attention intentionally, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally. Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) has been developed with the aim of reducing relapse and recurrence for those who are vulnerable to episodes of depression. It is needed because the risk of relapse and recurrence in those who have been depressed is very high, and the amount of triggering required for each subsequent episode becomes lower each time depression recurs.

In MBCT, participants meet together as a class (with a mindfulness teacher) two hours a week for eight weeks, plus one all day session between weeks five and seven. The main ‘work’ is done at home between classes. There is a set of CDs to accompany the course, which you use to practise on your own at home once a day, six days a week. In the classes, there is an opportunity to talk about your experiences with the home practices, the obstacles that inevitably arise, and how to deal with them skilfully.

Over the eight weeks of the course, the practices help you:

Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT)

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) gets its name from one of its core messages: accept what is out of your personal control, and commit to action that improves and enriches your life.

The aim of ACT is to maximise human potential for a rich, full and meaningful life. ACT (which is pronounced as the word 'act', not as the initials) does this by:

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is offered face-to-face and usually consists of around twelve sessions with each session lasting sixty minutes.

Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT)

Compassion-focused therapy (CFT) aims to help promote mental and emotional healing by encouraging people in treatment to be compassionate toward themselves and other people. Compassion, both toward the self and toward others, is an emotional response believed by many to be an essential aspect of well-being. Its development may often have the benefit of improved mental and emotional health.

The therapy can help people who struggle with the following issues:

Compassion-focused therapy (CFT) is offered face-to-face and usually consists of around twelve sessions with each session lasting sixty minutes.

Eye Movement Desensitisation & Reprocessing (EMDR)

Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR) is effective in treating people who have psychological difficulties as a result of traumatic experiences, such as assault, road traffic accidents, and sexual abuse.

During therapy the therapist will help you to recall emotionally disturbing events for very short periods, whilst at the same time focussing attention on something different such as eye movements, hand tapping, or audio-tones. EMDR aims to lower distress by changing the brain's way of processing disturbing memories and cope more effectively in situations that trigger anxiety.

Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR) is offered face-to-face and usually consists of around twelve sessions with each session lasting sixty minutes.

Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET)

Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET) is a treatment for people who are survivors of multiple and complex trauma.

NET helps put into context the associations around trauma experienced by the client. With the assistance of the therapist who will provide empathetic understanding and by actively listening, the client will be enabled to build a life story with a focus on the traumatic experience. This will help the person understand and process the memory of the traumatic event. This is an effective therapy for individuals who have post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms as a result of multiple traumatic experiences.

Narrative Exposure Therapy (NET) is offered face-to-face and usually consists of around twelve sessions with each session lasting up to two hours.

Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT)

Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) is based on exploring issues in relationships with other people and can currently be offered to people experiencing moderate levels of depression. It explores your relationships with peers, family members and the way you see yourself.

The goal is to work with your therapist to understand and identify interpersonal problems, and to manage relationship difficulties. During therapy, one or two current problem areas are chosen to focus on. Examples of areas covered are disputes with friends, family or co-workers, grief and loss, and role transitions, such as retirement or divorce.

Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT) is offered face-to-face and usually consists of around twelve sessions with each session lasting sixty minutes.

Dynamic Interpersonal Therapy (DIT)

Dynamic Interpersonal Therapy (DIT) focuses mostly on relationship problems. It aims to help people recognise specific relationship patterns and to make changes in their relationships.

Your therapist will encourage you to reflect on how you think and feel, thereby enhancing your ability to manage current interpersonal difficulties. They will support you to reach your own understanding of your experiences, without any judgement, whilst helping you to come to terms with difficult things that may have happened in your life so that you can move on.

Dynamic Interpersonal Therapy (DIT) is offered face-to-face and usually consists of around twelve sessions with each session lasting sixty minutes.

Couples Therapy

This treatment is for people who have depression and who are in a relationship. It is for for people whose partner is willing to join most sessions with the therapist. The couple should be able to work together on specific goals. Couples therapy is offered face-to-face and usually consists of between eight and sixteen sessions with each session lasting sixty minutes.

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